lunes, 24 de octubre de 2016

Over the Garden Wall

Posted Image

I'm gonna admit that I'm guilty of having lost almost my entire faith in animation right to the point where new series and installments were met with pessimism and, sometimes, watching them became a bit of a chore... but for good reasons! It seems to me that we have pulled a gigantic reversal in ourselves over the last decade or so: suddenly, the bright spots and inspired material were the exception rather than rule, and that was honestly shocking to witness. No longer did we have the power to produce entire series worth of brilliantly engaging material, outstanding visuals and relatable characters. It felt as if we -somehow- had the knowledge to keep the creative fire lit but forgot where we put the matches.

And the feeling was really difficult to shake off because it kept coming back to mind with an energy and consistency that would actually have made for some amazing stories had it been used to create and not because a certain quota of episodes needed to be met. And that right there is my major problem with most animated series to come out over the last decade: most entries on MOST series felt like the only point of their existence was to comply with a basic contractual rule... like when Disney only takes episodes in batches of twenty, for example. I think stuff like this harms the shows even before they are half-done because it forces an entire team of talented and passionate people to put something together because they NEED to do it. As if quantity was a substitute for quality... and it shows.

Even in some of my favorite shows there were times were I felt like the episodes at hand were a little tacked-on and had very little value on their own. I mean, it is common for a good show that's been in the air for long to start losing some of its thrust at later stages but we can see thru it as an audience and, sometimes, it hurts to see just how far we are going to go in order to have a pre-defined number of episodes out.

Posted Image

And it is for this very reason that what Cartoon Network did with Over the Garden Wall is praise-worthy. They ordered a MINI-SERIES, ten twelve-minutes installments that needed to tell a story from beginning to end while having a juicy plot and enough time to developing the characters, folklore and feels of the world they were tossed in. This basically meant "no-filler allowed" and the pay-off for this was fantastic.

The show literally throws us right into the action, when we meet our two protagonists: Wirt (voiced by Elijah Wood) and his younger brother Greg (voiced by Collin Dean). They are lost in "The Unknown", a forest where the dangerous and the absurd fuse and the borders between them blurs to the point of being almost non-existent. We don't know how they got lost and they don't know their way home either, so we tag along with them, getting to know them in detail throughout the whole thing.

And since Over the Garden Wall has the looks, feels and storytelling-devices of a fairy tale, this is a rich learning experience. Even better, things take a turn for the darker when we are introduced to the first inhabitants of The Unknown: The Woodsman (voiced by Christopher Lloyd) and the ever-so-scary Beast (voiced by Samuel Ramey in a delightful nightmare-inducing tone). It would be foolish to spoil anything here, but if you are seriously going to watch this series (which you should totally do, because it is an animated GEM) try to pay attention to the several interactions with The Woodsman... something is bond to feel off. But not even what's clearly stated by both him and The Beast would quite prepare you for the conclusion.

Posted Image

This is all nice, but the show doesn't truly start until after the second episode, when we meet Beatrice (voiced by Melanie Linskey). Many critics agree that she's the true stand-out characters of this series and I have no reason to disagree with them: she's the full package. A talking, somewhat unfriendly, unbelievably testy but nonetheless helpful Bluebird that tags along with them after Greg saves her from getting stuck somewhere. The development of this character is really up-there with the rest of the show's overwhelming artistic quality. And, just like The Woodsman, her character interactions feel a bit off since the very beginning. I assure you that no -spoiler-free- prediction would prepare you to face what the show has in store for her. One of the reasons for which Over the Garden Wall is such a worthwhile experience is its ability to make all the classic traits of storytelling in fairy tales seem like new and kind of unheard of. Things that shouldn't catch you off-guard will, indeed, hit you when you are not prepared.

Every episode of the show is its own self-contained story and it actually benefits from this. While there are some references to previous adventures and a delightful running gag makes its way throughout the entirety of the series, our characters only focus on what's ahead. And it sort of makes sense in a way... because no matter how many times they escape death by the inch of how many predicaments they get involved in, they are still just two lonely children looking for the way home. Moving ahead seems like what anyone would do if they were in their shoes; it's a "home wasn't back there so it must be here" way of thinking that works after you have spent some times with the characters. They are not fools, but they aren't thinking straight either.

Posted Image

And with such a colorful duo to move the plot forward, this is easy to forget. Take Greg for example: he's just a little kid (and the younger character in the series by far) and he should, therefore, be scared to death while marching thru The Unknown, but he's having too much fun embracing the weirdness of this unlikely world and its insane inhabitants to even care. Him being completely oblivious of the danger that surrounds him every step of the way might be a double-edged sword for the show's writing -and it sometimes feels like a bit of stretch to have him behave like this-... but, just like the show knows how to blur the line between danger and absurdity, it also knows how to do the same with foolishness and bravery. There's no actual "hero" to this tale (at least not in the most accurate definition of the concept) but Greg is as capable a hero as anyone else, and he certainly knows how to fill the role on his own term.

Wirt's writing isn't quite as wild. He definitely grows to overcome his doubts and fears in order to fulfill the role of an older brother looking after his sibling, but it is quite amusing to see him put his best judgment aside by bickering with Beatrice throughout the majority of the journey, and the lengths he's willing to cover in order annoy her. He's even put them all in danger just to prove a point (and I can't quite overlook the fact that he's been fooled into doing things that could very well have been traps without thinking that much about it -even when some of those turned out to be safe-). But for all his flaws, Wirt manages to hold on, even when he's clearly miserable, and that's part of what makes him the perfect fit to go along the happy-go-lucky Greg. Alone they would be doomed, but together they stand a chance.

Posted Image

Once again, all of this is very nice but not even the best writing in the world would deliver in a VISUAL medium like animation if the visuals weren't up for the task... and by God they are.

The show goes for an artistic style based on tones and shades that really suits it. When the action calls for it, everything turns into a black and gray tone that conveys danger just perfectly. And when we are strolling thru the forest in a quiet afternoon, the warmth "fall" colours take up the scene to tell us, without saying, that there's no hurry. It has been said that the best pacing is that which is invisible and now that I have experienced it first-hand, I can't do anything but agreeing with it.

Posted Image

The music is another winner. Each chapter comes with its own score (composed by the gypsy-folk band The Petrojvic Blasting Company) specially made to emphasize the varied nature of the episodes at hand. These are all great songs and they carry the plot just as much as the visuals (which is no small feat). In fact, the score was so well-received that Cartoon Network put out a version of the soundtrack on CASSETE (it makes sense given the context of the show) and it plans to have it out on a vinyl record as well -it's also available for download thru Soundcloud-.

I really don't have much else to say, except that I would totally encourage anyone who has two hours to kill to give this show a watch (it would be even better if you can afford to marathon thru it) because it has totally become one of my all-time favorite animated series and I would love to hear that it is now yours too.

martes, 6 de septiembre de 2016

Secuelas de Pac-Man - Parte 1

(Texto de Domingo H).

Me fascina Pac-Man. Es mi favorito de todos los grandes "clásicos de los arcades" de la época previa al NES (mi arcade favorito de todas las épocas sigue siendo la versión de Konami de Los Simpson). Me ha gustado desde el año 2000, cuando tenía yo nueve años y el juego casi veinte. Creo con toda sinceridad que no existe la más mínima traza de un alma en el cuerpo de aquellas personas a las que no les gusta (sospecho que semejante declaración no ofendería a ese tipo de personas).
Al igual que ocurre con muchos grandes éxitos de cualquier medio, Pac-Man tiene secuelas y derivadas; algunas muy buenas, otras malas, y otras absurdas. Hoy quise comentar todas las que existieron para arcades antes de 2000, aunque no las haya podido jugar de ninguna forma.

No dejen de leer: http://icedragonnet.blogspot.com/2015/06/pac-man-1982-atari-2600.html en el (prácticamente imposible) caso de que jamás hayan jugado al Pac-Man original. Al principio de aquel post se explican sus reglas básicas, sobre las que se basan la mayor parte de los juegos aquí comentados.

Posted Image

Plataforma: Arcade
Género: Laberinto, acción
Año: 1981
Desarolladora(s): General Computer Corporation, Midway, Midway Manufacturing Co.
Textos: Inglés

Así es, Midway, la misma de Mortal Kombat y NBA Jam, figura en las compañías desarrolladoras. ¿Qué hacen ellos metidos en la historia de Pac-Man? Pues al principio Namco no tenía oficinas en Occidente, y Midway tenía la licencia para distribuir sus juegos en Estados Unidos. Se la ganaron a Atari, que la rechazó, pero que más tarde obtuvo aquella para sacar versiones de consola y computadora.

Ms. Pac-Man es, al igual que Pac-Man, un juego que no hace falta reseñar porque todo está ya dicho, pero en esta ocasión es necesario empezar por él ya que es clave para entender el estado de los que le siguieron. La mecánica básica es la misma del original, pero con unos cuantos cambios.
Para empezar, y obviamente, tu personaje no es Pac-Man, sino una versión femenina llamada Ms. Pac-Man, que se parece a él pero tiene ojos de pestañas largas, labios pintados, un lunar en una mejilla y un lazo en la cabeza. Uno de los fantasmas también es una mujer, Sue (en realidad es Clyde, el anaranjado del original, pero con otro nombre). Pac-Man ya atraía una considerable cantidad de público femenino y la decisión de que el personaje controlable fuera una mujer era precisamente con el propósito de atraer aún más (iban a llamarlo "Pac-Woman" hasta que varias empleadas de Midway opinaron que ese título se oía muy sexista). Además hay cuatro laberintos en lugar de uno solo, tres de los cuales poseen cuatro túneles de escape en vez de dos. Los premios especiales (frutas, etc.) no aparecen bajo la casa de los fantasmas sino que surgen de uno de los túneles de escape, se ponen a dar rebotes por el laberinto y salen por otro túnel. Y los fantasmas son ahora más listos y más impredecibles, y el ritmo inicial del juego es ligeramente más rápido que en el primero. En el clásico hay una serie de animaciones graciosas que surgen al completar cada tantos niveles; aquí también, y cuentan una pequeña historia en la que Ms. Pac-Man y el Pac-Man original se conocen, se enamoran, se casan y tienen un hijo.

Debido a todos estos cambios, Ms. Pac-Man se considera un juego más difícil y mucho más variado que Pac-Man, y por lo tanto superior a él. No es nada raro encontrarse con negocios de arcade (los que quedan) en Estados Unidos donde no hay rastro de Pac-Man, pero que sí tienen a Ms. Pac-Man. En su época, Atari sacó una versión de Atari 2600 mucho mejor que la que ya habían sacado del juego de su marido (aunque tampoco era una tarea muy difícil...), y más tarde, bajo la identidad de Tengen, sacaron excelentes versiones para NES -esta sin licencia de Nintendo- y Sega Genesis, que añadían montones de laberintos más, un botón turbo opcional y un modo para dos jugadores simultáneos donde el jugador 2 controlaba a Pac-Man.

Y ahora lo malo; en 1981, Midway estaba muy necesitada de un nuevo juego de Pac-Man para cubrir la demanda de consumidores y dueños de negocios. Namco estaba haciendo uno, ya que Pac-Man también estaba arrasando en popularidad en Japón; pero se tomaba su tiempo, como debe ser. Impaciente, Midway compró a la General Computer Corporation una modificación de Pac-Man que acababa de hacer, llamada "Crazy Otto", y le cambiaron los gráficos lo suficiente como para convertirlo en Ms. Pac-Man; todo ello sin autorización de Namco, que no se lo tomó nada bien. Para que no hubiera rencilla, Midway le cedió a Namco todos los derechos del juego; mas no aprendió su lección...

Posted Image

Plataforma: Arcade
Género: Laberinto, acción
Año: 1982
Desarolladora(s): Namco Limited
Textos: Inglés

La secuela en la que Namco estaba trabajando resultó ser ésta. Aquí hay que establecer que, si bien es mundialmente reconocido como el creador de Pac-Man, Toru Iwatani solo ha trabajado en el Pac-Man original y en el posterior Pac-Man Championship Edition de 2007, el último juego que diseñó antes de retirarse para dar clases en la Universidad Politécnica de Tokio. Por lo tanto, no creo que alguna vez sepamos cómo hubiera sido en esa época una continuación diseñada por él. En su lugar tenemos Super Pac-Man, el cual se desviaba significativamente de la fórmula del original de un modo que a los jugadores occidentales no agradó mucho (me imagino que debe ser la misma gente que luego afirma que todos los juegos de deportes, Pokémon y Call of Duty son siempre el mismo y por lo tanto son todos malos).

El protagonista vuelve a ser Pac-Man, atrapado en un nuevo laberinto que, una vez más, es siempre el mismo en cada nivel (aunque cada ciertos niveles cambia de color). Su nueva misión es comerse todos los premios del laberinto, pero éstos están encerrados detrás de puertas que debe abrir comiendo llaves (no sé cómo funciona semejante lógica). Nuevamente los fantasmas lo persiguen, y nuevamente Pac-Man es capaz de voltear la balanza comiendo las píldoras de poder; pero esta vez hay dos píldoras verdes de "super poder". Al comérselas, Pac-Man se transforma brevemente en Super Pac-Man, una versión gigante de sí mismo capaz de atravesar fantasmas sin hacerse daño, romper las puertas sin necesidad de comerse las llaves y avanzar más rápido al aguantar un botón, aunque esto último lo vuelve más difícil de controlar. Cada tres niveles, si no me engaña la memoria, hay una escena de bonus donde no hay fantasmas y no tienes que hacer más que comerte todos los premios, siempre transformado en Super Pac-Man, antes de que se cumpla el tiempo límite. Lo más parecido que existe a los viejos premios de Pac-Man y Ms. Pac-Man es una especie de ruleta en el medio; un cuadro se para en un ítem mientras que el otro sigue rotando, y si tienes la suerte de agarrar la estrella de en medio de tal forma que el otro cuadro se pare en el mismo ítem que el primero, harás una jugosa cantidad de puntos.

Es un juego igual de entretenido que el original aunque no lo supere (y aunque el control sobre Super Pac-Man sea poco amistoso), pero si no soportas un juego de Pac-Man que no se apegue lo más rígidamente posible al original, no creo que lo quieras ni ver.

Posted Image

Plataforma: Arcade
Género: Laberinto, acción
Año: 1982
Desarolladora(s): Midway Games, Inc., Bally Midway Manufacturing Co., Inc.
Textos: Inglés

Pac-Man fue el primer juego con personajes definidos, el primero con animaciones entre niveles, el primero en atraer a la mayor parte del público y el prototipo de videojuego clásico; pero ¿sabían que era tan pionero que incluso fue el primer juego con revisiones? Mucho antes de que Capcom ordeñara a Street Fighter, Midway ya había sacado un "nuevo y emocionante" Pac-Man que realmente era el original con algunas alteraciones. Pero si bien cada nueva revisión de un juego de Street Fighter es genuinamente mejor que la anterior, Pac-Man Plus es peor que su predecesor al introducir una mayor dificultad... pero no como la de Ms. Pac-Man, sino de la forma "vamos a jalarte la alfombra por debajo de los pies para que te caigas".

Hay algunos cambios estéticos. El laberinto azul original es ahora verde, o quizás cerceta; los fantasmas al hacerse vulnerables se convierten en manzanas azules con todo y tallos en la cabeza (¿cómorl?); y los premios son latas de Coca-Cola, martinis, guisantes, etc. Pero eso no es lo que supuestamente hace "Plus" a este Pac-Man, sino que al comerte una píldora de poder, los fantasmas podrían volverse vulnerables... o podrían volverse vulnerables e invisibles, o las paredes del laberinto entero podrían volverse invisibles, o solo tres de los fantasmas podrían volverse vulnerables. ¡Agarrar una de las dos únicas defensas del jugador en el original y hacer que lo perjudique según le convenga
al juego es un golpe muy bajo! Se hizo para impedir que los jugadores emplearan "patrones", rutas que podías seguir en cada nivel para que los fantasmas no te agarraran ni una vez, y que estaban generándoles pérdidas a los dueños de los negocios. Los premios también actúan como píldoras de poder, pero de las que hacen invisibles y vulnerables a tus adversarios. Por lo menos haces más puntos de lo normal al comértelos si los debilitaste con un premio.

Este fue el segundo juego de Pac-Man hecho por Midway sin permiso de Namco, lo cual resulta irónico cuando lees los volantes publicitarios y ves que dicen cosas como "el nuevo kit de mejoras autorizado y oficial" o "el único paquete de conversión legal para Pac-Man" (refiriéndose a que te daban los elementos básicos necesarios para convertir una máquina de Pac-Man en una de Pac-Man Plus). No ha recibido muchas versiones domésticas, y las que ha recibido no sé si corren a cargo de Namco porque no sé si Namco tiene los derechos de más Pac-juegos de Midway además de Ms. Pac-Man. Tengo la teoría de que no, por motivos que explicaré más adelante.

Posted Image

Plataforma: Arcade, pinball
Género: Laberinto, acción, pinball
Año: 1982
Desarolladora(s): Bally Midway Manufacturing Co., Inc.
Textos: Inglés

En esta época, Midway era propiedad de Bally, una fabricante de pinball. Bally ya había sacado "Mr. and Mrs. Pac-Man", un pinball común y corriente con temática del matrimonio de los Pac-Man. Lo cual sigue sin explicarme por qué se les ocurrió mezclar pinball y videojuegos a la hora de celebrar el primer año de vida de su hijo.

La cosa comienza en la pantalla de video, donde manejas a Baby Pac-Man con un joystick, pero en un laberinto sin píldoras de poder y con los fantasmas más rápidos y agresivos hasta el momento. ¿Qué clase de padres son los Pac-Man como para meter a su hijo en un laberinto lleno de fantasmas sin píldoras de poder? Para hacerlas aparecer, debes meterte por uno de los túneles que conducen hacia abajo para activar la mesa de pinball, en la que puedes avanzar la categoría de los premios que aparecen en el modo video y hacer aparecer las píldoras al deletrear P-A-C-M-A-N. Si pierdes la bola, aparecerás de regreso en el modo video sin posibilidad de volver a la mesa de pinball, así que más te vale que hayas logrado activar las píldoras. Si no... ¡pobre de tu alma!

Posted Image

No puedo emular este juego correctamente hasta que no sepa si existe una buena recreación de la mesa en Visual Pinball (no soy jugador de pinball, pero no me cuadra mucho la física de las mesas recreadas de Visual Pinball; me recuerdan más al Cadete Espacial 3D), así que he tenido que tirar de datos externos. Mejor... ¿quién en su sano juicio querría jugar esto, de la forma que fuera?

Posted Image

Plataforma: Arcade
Género: Trivia/quiz, educativo
Año: 1983
Desarolladora(s): Bally Midway Manufacturing Co., Inc.
Textos: Inglés

Midway ataca de nuevo, ahora con un juego de preguntas y respuestas con tiempo límite, del tipo "¿cuál es la figura diferente de las demás?", "¿cuántas curvas hace falta tomar para llegar a tal sitio?" y otras cosas que con comprarte un libro de pasatiempos de esos que venden en la calle debería serte suficiente, presentado por un Pac-Man con birrete y anteojos de media luna. Insípido como él solo.

Lo incluyo para poder contarles que Midway pensó que los arcades de trivia iban a ser la bomba, y planeó sacar tres modelos; el "Familiar", para niños; el "Público", para arcades y bares; y el "Premios", para casinos; además de sacar revisiones cada cierto tiempo para que la gente no se aprendiera las respuestas. Solo hicieron 400 modelos "Públicos", de los cuales 300 se devolvieron y convirtieron en máquinas de Pac-Land al año siguiente; hoy en día sobreviven menos de 100, y se cree que el número total no pasa de las dos cifras.

La parte 1 termina aquí porque vengo escribiendo este texto desde hace muchos años y lo he dejado de lado… y algo tengo que entregar después de haberlo prometido. Nos vemos en la parte 2.

sábado, 20 de agosto de 2016

IDN Forum!


Thanks to a ton of help by Darkling Nocturnal (who designed our previous logo), IDN finally has forum in which we can -hopefully- keep everything more organized. Naturally, everybody is welcome to join this new stage on IDN's life - and you can do it by follow this handy URL:


We hope to see you there!